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The challenges behind VoLTE

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In previous blog posts and demos we showed that a simplified approach is the way to obtain clear results in deploying VoLTE and 2G/4G mixed networks. We performed the industry’s first VoLTE call from a GSM mobile phone to an iPhone 6, through a single unified core network, the YateUCN, and we presented our solution for handling SRVCC as an inter-MSC handover from 4G to 2G in the same YateUCN. Follow our take on why VoLTE hasn’t developed as rapidly as we all expected it would. We’ll give our insight and what we’ve learned from the many discussion we’ve had with mobile operators and smartphone producers alike.

Sure, VoLTE is great! Combining the powers of IMS and LTE, VoLTE offers excellent high-definition voice calls. It also guarantees a Quality of Service component, ensuring that customers get an unprecedented quality of voice services. However, VoLTE depends on far too many aspects to be fully functional and widely deployed, contrary to what optimistic reports have predicted in the past.

volte_issues

One of the main issues operators and customers alike are facing is the fact that there’s still a shortage of VoLTE capable smartphones. By April 2015 Verizon offered around 15 devices supporting VoLTE, while AT&T’s smartphone selection included around 19 devices capable of HD voice, in July 2015, as seen on their online shop. iPhone6 is still the only device capable of supporting VoLTE for all the operators that offer it. What’s more, most of these devices came from about 5 smartphone vendors, giving customers a limited choice when they buy a new phone.

Approximately 97% of VoLTE capable smartphones have their LTE chipset from the same vendor. According to reports from smartphone producers and operators alike, the VoLTE client is not stable enough, this being the reason why some vendors don’t even activate VoLTE in the baseband, and also why operators implement VoLTE in both the smartphones and the IMS network itself differently.

This also leads to the lack of interoperability between mobile carriers. Currently, VoLTE works only between devices belonging to the same network: for example, a T-Mobile customer using a VoLTE capable handset cannot roam in the AT&T VoLTE network of a called party. However, this was one of the main goals when VoLTE specifications were developed and we should still expect it to happen at some point.

Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, VoLTE deployments are scarce. A GSA report from July 2015 showed that only 25 operators have commercially launched VoLTE networks in 16 countries, while there are around 103 operators in 49 countries who are planning, trialling or deploying VoLTE. Compared with the total of 422 LTE networks commercially launched in 143 countries, VoLTE deployments are dramatically lower. This is the result of mobile carriers having a difficult time planing and building functional LTE and VoLTE networks, while also developing the essential Single Radio Voice Call Continuity (SRVCC) technology in an effective and performable way.

VoLTE still needs to leap over many hurdles until it becomes a technology used world wide. Operators, network equipment vendors, smartphones and chipset producers need to cooperate and jointly find technical solutions that will allow for a more swift VoLTE roll-out in most LTE networks.

posted Aug 7, 2015 by Gratiela D

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